Browsing All posts tagged under »online collections«

Should museums just give up now and let Google take responsibility for knowledge?

May 17, 2012

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Wow – so the introduction of Google Knowledge Graph today has some fascinating implications for museums, knowledge, and everything else. As the Mashable account of the new move by the company explains: Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. […]

Do deaccessioned items belong in the online collection?

May 7, 2012

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As regular readers would know, in the last week or two, I’ve been reading Rethinking the Museum by Stephen E. Weil. In the latter sections of the book, Weil addresses the issue of deaccessioning in museums, and it prompted me to think about how museums deal with deaccessioned objects in their online collections. What happens […]

Museum collections and the “rhetoric gap”

April 29, 2012

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There are a couple of questions that have started nagging at me when I look at museum websites, and particularly when I look at online collections. With the American Association of Museums annual meeting on in the States this week, it seemed like a good time to start asking them. Are museum collections actually as […]

Why should I believe anything you tell me, you nameless and faceless institution?!?

December 3, 2011

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I had the exceptional good fortune at MCN2011 of coming away with dozens of unanswered questions, and more than a handful of lovely people with whom to try to figure out the answers. My hands have barely left my keyboard in the last couple of weeks, as I’ve tried to capture ideas, exchange emails and […]

Quick bite: On early results from my research at the PHM

October 8, 2011

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Seb has just popped up a post on Fresh + New[er] that includes some of the research I’ve been doing at the Powerhouse Museum. It looks at some of the early results, including identifying who some of our collection users are, and how our curators are conducting research. Check it out.

If a tree falls in a museum, and no one is there to hear it…

June 26, 2011

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Australian IT policy advisor Pia Waugh has just posted the first of a series of four posts on online culture. This one, titled Unicorns and Doom, investigates some of the ways that the Internet is changing mainstream culture. As she writes Using the Internet changes your expectations of the world around you, and importantly your […]